TARGETING STEM CELL-GENERATED BETA CELLS FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES TREATMENT

 

 

KEY POINTS:

 

  • A recent study may have found a way to improve the number and quality of beta cells produced for cell replacement therapy. 
  • Researchers found that by adding CD77  they can better control the differentiation of cells into specific pancreatic progenitors. 
  • Having these pancreatic progenitors present at the start of the differentiation process may lead to higher quality beta cells that are more responsive to glucose and have improved insulin secretion abilities.
  • Being able to better control the differentiation process may improve beta cell replacement therapy options for individuals with type 1 diabetes.

 

To know more , please read the article below:

 

In developing more effective treatment methods for type 1 diabetes, several approaches have targeted the disease at a cellular level. Scientists know that, on the most basic level, the disease stems from the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells. However, they are unsure exactly what causes the body to mistakenly attack and destroy these cells. There have been many studies looking at how to reintroduce or stimulate these beta cells within the body in order to produce insulin naturally, but this is a difficult process and one that is hard to sustain.

A recent study may have found a way to improve the number and quality of beta cells produced for cell replacement therapy. The differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into targeted beta cells is a long, complex process that can take weeks. Even after the process is finished, there is an assortment of cells that have been produced because not all cells differentiate as desired. In addition, not all beta cells are fully functional.

Researchers found that by adding CD77, a monoclonal antibody, they can better control the differentiation of cells into specific pancreatic progenitors. Having these pancreatic progenitors present at the start of the differentiation process may lead to higher quality beta cells that are more responsive to glucose and have improved insulin secretion abilities. In addition, it may help direct differentiation meaning a more homogenous group of cells is created, which is beneficial for cell replacement therapy. Having more of the desired type of cell can also save time and money.

Being able to better control the differentiation process may improve beta cell replacement therapy options for individuals with type 1 diabetes. Developing ways for the body to once again generate its own insulin and manage blood glucose levels could change the way the disease is managed. This study was a partnership between Helmholtz Zentrum München, the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Technical University of Munich (TUM), and Miltenyi Biotec.

Though not involved with this study, the Diabetes Research Connection stays abreast of the latest advancements in the field and how emerging research may impact the diagnosis, treatment, and management of type 1 diabetes, as well as the search for a cure. As more about the disease is understood, researchers can build on this information. The DRC provides critical funding for early-career scientists whose research is focused on type 1 diabetes

The source: https://diabetesresearchconnection.org

COULD THERE BE MORE THAN ONE FORM OF TYPE 1 DIABETES?

 

KEY POINTS:

  • There are significant differences between type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D).
  • According to a recent study, there may be more than one endotype, and a major differentiator could be age of diagnosis.
  • Therapeutic trials could be aimed at groups depending on age of diagnosis and specific endotype in the future as larger studies are conducted to determine the significance of these findings.
  • Recognizing that T1D affects people differently is a step in the right direction toward more personalized medicine and targeted therapies. 

To know more, please read the article below.

 

Researchers know that there are significant differences between type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), but now they are digging a little deeper. When it comes to T1D, the disease may not affect everyone in the same way. According to a recent study, there may be more than one endotype, and a major differentiator could be age of diagnosis.

The study looked at a small sample of 19 children diagnosed with T1D within the past two years and compared age of diagnosis against amount of beta cell destruction and levels of proinsulin and C-peptides. They also compared these ratios in a group of 171 adults with T1D based on their age of diagnosis. Their results showed that children who were diagnosed before the age of 7 had much higher levels of proinsulin-insulin co-localization than those diagnosed after age 13. Individuals between ages 7 and 13 were divided and fell into one group or the other.

The researchers also compared results against CD20Hi and CD20Lo immune profile designations for each participant. Children age 7 or younger tended to be CD20Hi, while those age 13 or older were CD20Lo, and the children in between were aligned with their respective groups based on whether they were CD20Hi or CD20Lo.

These differences in proinsulin and C-peptide concentrations demonstrate a distinction in how individuals are impacted by T1D, leading to at least two separate endotypes. Understanding whether an individual has T1D endotype 1 (T1DE1) or T1D endotype 2 (T1DE2) could enable more targeted and effective treatment of the disease based on how each group responds. Individuals with T1DE1 are identified as having higher levels of beta cell loss, therefore may have more difficulty regulating blood glucose. Those with T1DE2 may retain more beta cells, and determining ways to activate and protect these cells could support improved natural insulin production.

Recognizing that T1D affects people differently is a step in the right direction toward more personalized medicine and targeted therapies. Therapeutic trials could be aimed at groups depending on age of diagnosis and specific endotype in the future as larger studies are conducted to determine the significance of these findings.

The source: https://diabetesresearchconnection.org/

RECAPPING CURRENT RESEARCH REGARDING TYPE 1 DIABETES DEVELOPMENT AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISKS

 

 

KEY POINTS:

  • Researchers revealed new studies regarding the potential role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the development of type 1 diabetes.
  • A recent study shows that lncRNA may be involved in the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells.
  • Researchers could begin modifying the lncRNAs to create a targeted therapy that increases survival rate and viability of the pancreatic beta cells.
  • Researchers are constantly improving and refining their understanding of Type 1 Diabetes and possible ways to prevent, treat, or cure it.

To know more, please read the article below.

 

Our bodies are formed from an innumerable number of cells and molecules. Both DNA and RNA play a role in determining cells’ function and purpose. At a conference of the National Congress of the Spanish Diabetes Society, researchers revealed new studies regarding the potential role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the development of type 1 diabetes, as well as the risk of cardiovascular problems in individuals with the disease.

A recent study found that lncRNA, which are use in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of cells and are not translated into proteins, may be involved in the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells. There may be some forms of lncRNAs that affect inflammation and cell death, which are factors in the development of type 1 diabetes.

Dr. Izortze Santín Gómez, a professor at the University of the Basque Country and a researcher at the Biocruces Bizkaia Research Institute is studying the fundamental characteristics of the lncRNAs and how they may affect pancreatic beta cells on a genetic-molecular level. Once this is better understood, researchers could begin modifying the lncRNAs to create a targeted therapy that increases survival rate and viability of the pancreatic beta cells.

Another study that was presented at the conference involved cardiovascular risk for individuals with type 1 diabetes. Joseph Ribalta, a professor at the Rovira i Vigili University of Reus, found that “more than 30% of heart attacks occur in people with apparently normal LDL cholesterol.” High cholesterol is a key risk factor for heart attacks. His findings have revealed that individuals with T1D may be at greater risk because “LDL particles are more numerous and smaller, that their HDLs work less effectively and/or that there are some lipoproteins (remnants) that the body has trouble eliminating.”

Identifying these potential risk factors and knowing how to test for or treat them could help reduce hidden cardiovascular risk in individuals with T1D. For instance, focusing on triglycerides rather than cholesterol may be beneficial for patients who meet certain criteria.

There is a lot of interesting work coming out of laboratories and universities around the world regarding type 1 diabetes. Researchers are constantly improving and refining their understanding of the disease and possible ways to prevent, treat, or cure it. Diabetes Research Connection (DRC) is committed to contributing to this wealth of knowledge by providing critical funding to early-career scientists pursuing novel research studies focused on type 1 diabetes. 

The source: https://diabetesresearchconnection.org/

NEW ORAL TREATMENT MAY HELP WITH MANAGING HBA1C FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES

 

 KEY POINTS:

  • A recent study shows that one pill a day used in conjunction with insulin may help reduce HbA1c levels by as much as 0.32% after 12 weeks. 
  • The pill  TTP399, activates glucokinase in the liver.  This stimulates the body to improve glucose utilization which lowers blood glucose levels.
  • TTP399  could be used in conjunction with insulin therapy as a way of further managing and reducing HbA1c levels.
  • Diabetes Research Connection  is interested to see how it evolves moving forward, and what it could mean for the future of oral treatment involving noninsulin products.

To know more, please read the article below.

 

Keeping HbA1c levels within a healthy range can be challenging for those living with type 1 diabetes. It requires constant vigilance when it comes to monitoring blood sugar levels and administering the appropriate amount of insulin. Even with careful management, there can be complications.

A recent study found that a once-daily pill used in conjunction with insulin may help reduce HbA1c levels by as much as 0.32% after 12 weeks.  The pill, known as TTP399, activates glucokinase in the liver.  This, in turn, stimulates the body to improve glucose utilization which can lead to lower blood glucose levels. Overall, this could help improve HbA1c levels as well as time spent within a healthy glucose range.

A randomized, double-blind, adaptive study compared participants taking the TTP399 pill versus those on a placebo.  Those who received the pill showed improved glucose response and fewer symptomatic hypoglycemic episodes.  The average improvement in HbA1c was 0.21%, and there was also an average of an 11% reduction in the dosage amount of total daily mealtime bolus insulin needed.

On the other hand, the placebo group showed a 0.11% increase in HbA1c after the 12-week trial period.  Neither group reported any incidences of diabetic ketoacidosis, and there was only one incident of severe hypoglycemia, which occurred in the placebo group.

This phase 2 study involved 85 participants. They were all currently either administering daily injections or using an insulin pump.  If they were using a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), they had to be on it for at least three months prior to the start of the study to be included.

According to Steve Holcomb, president and CEO of vTv Therapeutics, “Consistent with FDA guidance, a 0.3% improvement in HbA1c is considered clinically meaningful and coupled with the well-controlled population of patients and favorable safety data from our clinical trials to date, this provides a strong basis for moving this potential first-in-class program forward.”

The pill could be used in conjunction with insulin therapy as a way of further managing and reducing HbA1c levels. This an exciting step forward in terms of type 1 diabetes management and supporting individuals in staying within healthy ranges for HbA1c and daily blood sugar levels.

Diabetes Research Connection (DRC), though not involved with this study, is interested to see how it evolves moving forward, and what it could mean for the future of oral treatment involving noninsulin products.

Research for type 1 diabetes continues to improve and advance every single day, and DRC helps makes this possible by providing critical funding to early-career scientists pursuing novel research studies on type 1 diabetes.  Through generous donations from individuals, corporations, and foundations, they are able to provide researchers with up to $50K in funding to support studies aimed at improving prevention measures, enhancing quality of life, reducing complications, and finding a cure.

The source: https://diabetesresearchconnection.org/